Football


CEOs Out of Bounds

Social Organization and Change Leadership Lead by example.  Can companies still rely on a single individual at the top to handle the complexity and uncertainty of the global environment? in general: accountability: The buck stops here. Truman | anti-leadership: despotism | bios: Amazing People Library | greatness: about | journals: Leader to Leader | narcissistic leaders | team of rivals | toxic leaders | training: disneyinstitute, Salzburg Global Seminar       charisma: research: measurement | visualization empowerment: thinkingmanagers | quotes: woopidoo | self-management: morningstarco | situational leadership heroes: As a leader, are you passionate and focus on a few key principles which you will not sacrifice under any circumstances?  How strong is your willpower?  Does your willpower have staying power?  Can you weather a long storm?  Can you effectively communicate your key principles?  Are you getting the message across?  Do you strive for generosity, nobility, humility, and strength of character? | recognition: Carnegie Hero Fund | Finding A Hero Amid Fading Memories humility: The true leader sits side-by-side with his brother and sister, content that his fame and fortune is a bonus in his daily life, and never expecting special treatment but always appreciative when it comes his way. sp wisdom: A skillful leader can use a light touch to solve a vexing problem. Miller | clinical wisdom nursing | quotes: www.wisdomquotes.com | National Urban Fellows books, articles, forums: CEOs Out of Bounds sp > CEO | Good Boss, Bad Boss Sutton | Heroes Johnson | Heroes of History Durant | How to Win Friends and Influence People Carnegie | Leadership Ensembles Thomas | Made to Stick Heath | Making Your Case: The Art of Persuading Judges Scalia | On Becoming a Leader Bennis | On Leadership Gardner | Renaissance Weekend | Start with Why Sinek | Strengths-Based Leadership | The Age of Lincoln Burton | The First 90 Days Watkins | The Last Lecture Pausch | The Little Big Things Peters | The Starfish and the Spider Brafman | transparency: Maverick!, TED Talk Semler big ideas | Tribes: We Need You to Lead Us Godin | What to Ask the Person in the Mirror Kaplan

 

by scott pickard

Sport plays an important part in the lives of many business leaders. Nothing can make the juices flow like sinking a 30-foot birdie putt to win the match or setting a personal record in the local 10K run. Risking, winning and losing, playing, pushing personal limits – all are tonics for the chief executive, but they require “getting in the game.”

For Dick Jorgensen, Red Cashion, and Tom Dooley, getting in the game was a way of life. During their days as NFL Referees,  they were chief executives of successful corporations, but on the weekends they exchanged their business suits for “zebra suits” to become NFL referees. Whether on the field or off, these CEOs shared an uncommon passion to perform their best.

Dick Jorgensen: Banking on the Blitz

Dick Jorgensen had the distinction of having been the head referee for 1990’s Super Bowl XXIV. It was the pinnacle of a 22-year career as an NFL referee when one considers that the officials on Super Bowl Sunday are voted the best at their position by the NFL.

Head Referee Dick Jorgensen (#60) follows San Francisco quaterback Joe Montana (#16) and the rest of the action at Sperbowl XXIV in 1990.

When he was not watching Joe Montana fade back for the bomb, Jorgensen was president of Marine Bank in Champaign, IL, a banking affiliate of the Marine Corporation with over $1 billion in assets. The bank always supported Dick’s other life as an NFL referee, as banks generally support the active community involvement of all employees.

At 56 (in 1990) and coming off recent back surgery, Dick moved a little slower than he did as captain of the University of Wisconsin’s basketball team.  He was concerned about his upcoming annual NFL physical and stress test, but he was determined to pass. He daily stretched, swam, and lifted weights – whatever it took to ensure he would get another shot at a Super Bowl. Having participated in Super Bowls VIII, XV, and XXIV, he didn’t want to pass up another opportunity to be part of “the immensity of the game.”

The rewards of a Super Bowl experience, however, aren’t without cost. The pressures of balancing a banking career and an active family life while on the road for the NFL were substantial, especially for the family left behind each weekend. “But once the kickoff comes and I get into the flow of the game,” asserted Jorgensen, “all the pressure is off. It’s exhausting, but mentally refreshing.”

Tom Dooley: Constructing a Game Plan

Tom Dooley, former CEO of R.T. Dooley Construction, says his 14 years of working out problems on an NFL football field helped him work out problems in business. “On the football field,” he observed, “you have a set of rules and a solution.” Dooley was proud of the fact that in all his years as CEO, he never had to retain an attorney to solve a legal problem!

“Nothing is black and white in business,” continued Dooley. “Everything is a compromise. On the football field, it is black and white. I can flush out every thought in the world when I’m on that field.” And like Dick Jorgensen, Tom Dooley got that same physical exhaustion but mental freshness after each game.

To make it possible for Tom to work weekends for the NFL and keep his business under control, he surrounded himself with “people smarter than I am.” And what was good for the boss was good for the troops. Business shut down every day at 11:30 am so employees could get in a vigorous noon workout at the local YMCA (the company paid every employee’s membership fee).

Dooley believed strongly in being “the best you can be.” After a lifetime of setting goals and achieving them, he still had one in his sights – to work a Super Bowl as head referee. He had a taste of Super Bowl action as a linesman at Super Bowl XV, Eagles vs Raiders, in 1981. But characteristic of every NFL referee, Dooley wanted a shot at the No. 1 position.

Red Cashion: A Variable Life

On April 21, 1990, Texas Independence Day, Red Cashion had the honor of being keynote speaker at Texas A&M’s “annual muster,” following in the footsteps of the mayor of San Antonio, the governor of Texas, and Ike Eisenhower. For a Texan, especially one that lived and worked in College Station (Aggie country), this was as big an honor as being referee at Super Bowl XX, Bears vs. Patriots, in 1986.

Speaking before students, athletes, and business people went with the territory for this NFL referee who was also chairman of ANCO insurance which he co-founded in 1966. The challenges and lessons of business and sport were inseparable for Cashion, helping him develop what he called “presence.”

Red enjoyed “being in the center of the action.” It took him 20 years of refereeing in junior high through college ranks before being accepted into the NFL where he officiated from 1972 – 1996 (25 years).

Obviously, the pressure of officiating wasn’t a problem for Cashion, having been at it for so long. He enjoyed keeping himself in shape through competitive handball. “Frankly,” he says, “I enjoy the annual NFL physical and stress test.”

The greater challenge for Cashion was making the right decision under pressure. Being an NFL referee helped him develop confidence in himself and his decisions, a quality employees respected.

When he returned each Monday following an NFL game, football was the topic of the day. Employees always greet him with questions about the game. Although Cashion admitted that “after a while, you forget which city you were in,” he will never forget being head referee in Super Bowls XX (1986, Bears vs Patriots) and XXX (1996, Cowboys vs. Steelers).

* * *

Note from Scott Pickard: “I wrote this feature article under assignment to Chief Executive magazine and it was subsequently published in September, 1990.  Sadly, Dick Jorgensen passed away in October, 1990.  He was a well-known personality and highly-respected leader in Champaign, IL.”

- sp -

That’s my Dad!

Sports Golf change: The Future of Golf When will you shoot your age? Is golf a sport? who cares, we love it in general: big hole golf | Fedex Cup | foot golf | handicap: formula | magic | online game: http://pgacharitychallenge.worldgolftour.com, Virtual U.S. Open | outings: player grid sp | PGA: pgatour | performance: priming | Ryder Cup: Ryder Cup, Ryder Cup Diary 2012 sp | rules: smartphone, videos | sand: soft sand, hit hard; hard sand, hit soft | social: topgolf | speed golf | soul of the game | youth: Drive, Chip & Putt books: Golf Rules Finder sp Equations | Entertainment | Change | Unequivocal | Gaming | Family

Sports Golf Is golf a sport? who cares, we love it in general: big hole golf | Fedex Cup | foot golf | humor: bogeypro | magic | online game: http://pgacharitychallenge.worldgolftour.com, Virtual U.S. Open | outings: player grid | PGA: pgatour | performance: priming | Ryder Cup: Ryder Cup, Ryder Cup Diary 2012 sp | rules: smartphone, videos | sand: soft sand, hit hard; hard sand, hit soft | speed golf | soul of the game | youth: Drive, Chip & Putt Gaming | Family | Magic | Popular Culture
97 years old, shoots a 96
Golf keeps Picard young at heart
by Eden Laase
Wednesday, June 4, 2014
GJsentinel

Joe Picard started golfing at the age of 14. That was in 1931.

He recently celebrated his 97th birthday, and he’s still playing golf.

In fact, on that birthday, he shot a round of 96 at Lincoln Park Golf Course.

Picard jumps in and out of his golf cart with youthful ease. He drives himself to Lincoln Park, and he plays a full round of golf every Friday.

“He’s a pleasure to play with. He plays quickly, he plays well, and he’s got a nice swing,” said Brian Tobin, who has been golfing with Picard for about a year.

According to Tobin, Picard’s sharpness, mentally and physically, make him a marvel and hero to the seniors’ golf group he plays with every week.

“I’ve been fortunate to have good health at this age, and I still love the game,” Picard said, before adding with a laugh, “It’s a game that you can play as long as you can walk.”

Eighty-three years ago, Picard’s father had appendix surgery and was told by his doctor to start exercising. The doctor recommended golf, and Picard became his father’s caddy.

It didn’t take long for Picard to realize he could make money caddying for other people. Through his job, Picard developed a passion for golf, but he had a slight problem, a lack of golf clubs.

“I found an old club and played a temporary course in the caddy yard with a 2-iron,” Picard said. “Someone had discarded it, and I found it.”

Now, Picard uses a set of Wilson Staff clubs he has had for 10 years. He may have moved past the single 2-iron he started playing with, but the same characteristics of golf that caught his attention all those years ago still captivate him today.

Picard said he loves the fellowship and friendly competition golf provides, but more than anything he loves the character that can be developed through the game.

“Golf is the only sport that has definite rules, and the rules are such that the golfer calls penalties on himself,” Picard said. “You build ethical character doing the right thing even though no one is watching.”

Because of this, Picard passed golf down to his entire family. He has two sons and two daughters, and they all play golf.

Picard is looking forward to a family reunion in August when 15 of the 27 attending family members will play golf together.

“We only have reunions every three years, so that’s not really a factor that keeps us close. We are just a close family anyway,” he said.

Picard said he is glad the close-knit group shares his love of golf.

Although he is long past his golfing prime, which Picard said he reached in the 1960s, averaging about 78 strokes per round, he still strives to improve each time he plays.

“Regardless of your age, you are always trying to get better,” he said.

“I’ve played tennis, too, and I’ve played sandlot football. I’ve played sandlot everything, and there is nothing that builds character like golf,” Picard said. “I can’t play tennis any more, but I can play golf.”

CEOs Out of Bounds


Jorgensen and Montana

Sport plays an important part in the lives of many business leaders. Nothing can make the juices flow like sinking a 30-foot birdie putt to win the match or setting a personal record in the local 10K run. Risking, winning, playing, pushing personal limits – all are tonics for the chief executive, but they require “getting in the game.”

For Dick Jorgensen, Red Cashion, and Tom Dooley, getting in the game is a way of life. During the week they are chief executives of successful corporations, but on the weekends they exchange their business suits for “zebra suits” to become NFL referees. Whether on the field or off, these CEOs at leisure share an uncommon passion to perform their best.

Dick Jorgensen: Banking on the Blitz

Dick Jorgensen has the distinction of having been the head referee for 1990s Super Bowl XXIV. It was the pinnacle of a 22-year career as an NFL referee, when one considers that the officials on Super Bowl Sunday are voted the best at their position by the NFL.

When he’s not watching Joe Montana fade back for the bomb, Jorgensen is president of Marine Bank in Champaign, IL, a banking affiliate of the Marine Corporation, with over $1 billion in assets. The bank has always supported Dick’s other life as an NFL referee, as banks generally support the active community involvement of all employees.

At 56 and coming off recent back surgery, Dick moves a little slower than he did as captain of the University of Wisconsin’s basketball team. Although he’s concerned about his upcoming annual NFL physical and stress test, he’s determined to pass. He stretches, swims, lifts weights – whatever it takes to ensure he’s got another Super Bowl in him. Having participated in Super Bowls VIII, XV, and XXIV, he won’t pass up another opportunity to be part of “the immensity of the game.”

The rewards of a Super Bowl experience, however, aren’t without cost. The pressures of balancing a banking career and an active family life while on the road for the NFL are substantial, especially for the family left behind each weekend. “But once the kickoff comes and I get into the flow of the game,” asserts Jorgensen, “all the pressure is off. It’s exhausting, but mentally refreshing.”

Tom Dooley: Constructing a Game Plan

Tom Dooley, chief executive of R.T. Dooley Construction, says his 13 years of working out problems on an NFL football field have helped him work out problems in business. “On the football field,” he observes, “you have a set of rules and a solution.” Dooley is proud of the fact that in all his years as CEO, he’s never had to retain an attorney to solve a legal problem.

“Nothing is black and white in business,” continues Dooley. “Everything is a compromise. On the football field, it is black and white. I can flush out every thought in the world when I’m on that field.” And like Dick Jorgensen, Tom Dooley gets that same physically exhausted but mentally refreshed feeling after each game.

To make it possible for Tom to work weekends for the NFL and keep his business under control, he surrounds himself with “people smarter than I am.” And what’s good for the boss is good for the troops. Business shuts down every day at 11:30 am so employees can get in a vigorous noon workout at the local YMCA (the company pays every employee’s membership fee).

Dooley believes strongly in being “the best you can be.” After 55 years of setting goals and achieving them, he still has one in his sights – to work a Super Bowl as head referee. He had a taste of Super Bowl action as a linesman at Super Bowl XV, Eagles vs Raiders, in 1981. But characteristic of every NFL referee, Dooley wants a shot at the No. 1 position.

Red Cashion: A Variable Life

On April 21, 1990, Texas Independence Day, Red Cashion had the honor of being keynote speaker at Texas A&M’s “annual muster,” following in the footsteps of the mayor of San Antonio, the governor of Texas, and Ike Eisenhower. For a Texan, especially one that lives and works in College Station (Aggie country) this was as big an honor as being a referee at Super Bowl XX, Bears vs. Patriots, in 1986.

Speaking before students, athletes, and businesspeople goes with the territory for an NFL referee who is also chairman of ANCO insurance which he co-founded in 1966. The challenges and lessons of business and sport have been inseparable for Cashion, helping him develop what he calls “presence.”

Red enjoys “being in the center of the action.” It took him 20 years of refereeing in junior high through college ranks before being accepted into the NFL, where he now has 18 years under his cap.

Obviously, the pressure of officiating hasn’t been a problem for Cashion, having been at it 40 years. He enjoys keeping himself in shape through competitive handball. “Frankly,” he says, “I enjoy the annual NFL physical and stress test.”

The greater challenge for Cashion is making the right decision under pressure. Being an NFL referee has helped him develop confidence in himself and his decisions, a quality employees respect.

When he returns on Monday following a game, football is the topic of the day. Employees always greet him with questions about the game. Although Cashion admits that “after a while, you forget which city you were in,” he will never forget Super Bowl XX.

* * *

CEOs Out of Bounds by Scott PickardChief Executive, Vol. 61, September, 1990, pp. 78-80.