Joseph Simmons Pickard

Good morning everyone and thank you for being here to celebrate the life our Dad, Joe Pickard. My name is Scott Pickard and I am the third of Betty and Joe’s four children: Carolyn of Grand Junction; Larry of Houston, TX; Scott of Champaign, IL; and Kay of Denver, CO. Joseph Pickard passed away just a few days before Thanksgiving, that wonderful holiday when we celebrate the many blessings we all share in America. In that lingering spirit of Thanksgiving, and now with the Christmas season ahead, our family wishes to say “thank you” to our Dad’s many friends, supporters, and caregivers that have made his life (and our Mom’s) so happy and peaceful since they moved here eight years ago.

We know there are many members of the First Presbyterian Church here today. Our family would like to thank you all for the friendship and fellowship you have given to our dad since he first became a member of this fine church. Joe Pickard was a man of softly-spoken yet unwavering faith which was the bedrock and compass guiding him through a resilient, successful, and joyful life. He loved this church and its congregation. Thank you, First Presbyterian members. And we must say a very special thank you to Pastor Tom Hansen for all that he has done to bring our family together during the passing of our mom, Betty Pickard, three years ago, and now our dad, Joe Pickard. Tom’s wise words and positive spirit have given our family comfort and peace during these times. Thank you very much, Pastor Tom.

And we need to thank everybody in our family who have traveled far to celebrate the life of Joseph Simmons Pickard: our dad, father-in-law, granddad, great granddad, and the leader and main event at all of our family reunions. The “Pickard Family Tree” that flows from Betty and Joe Pickard now numbers 37, soon to be 38 when a baby granddaughter will be born in February to Ryan and Caitlin Pickard of Houston, Texas. Our family has been reunioning someplace in the United States every other summer for the last 20 years. Just this last summer we were all together in Grand Junction at the Wine Country Inn. We had a great time and Dad had a great time with his 19 grand and great-grandchildren all around him. So a big Thank You to this wonderful family.

We know that there are many residents and staff members from the Atrium here today to pay their respects to Joe Pickard. The Atrium has been home to our parents since 2008. We want to thank the residents and staff for your friendship toward our parents, and Joe in these last three years since mom passed away. We want to thank the staff at the Atrium for their kind and caring services, day-in and day-out, which made it a comfortable and peaceful home for Dad. And as you all know, Joe never missed a meal, so that must say something! Thank you to all the residents and staff at the Atrium.

In particular, though, we need to thank Joe’s close friends – Marilyn, Richard, and Jim — who sat together every day to share breakfast, lunch, and dinner at what they called the “Happy Table”. You helped Dad get through a very sad time after our mom passed away. He so enjoyed your friendship and good humor each and every day. A heartfelt thank you to the Happy Table crew.

We know there are many family and friends here that have played golf with Joe Pickard at one time or another. We want to say thank you to his golfing buddies for all of the good times and fellowship you shared with him on and off the golf course. If you were lucky enough to play golf with Joe, you had to call all your penalties and make all of your putts, even if the ball was 1 inch from the hole! He was an exceptional golfer and it was, second to being with mom, his greatest passion and the most fun thing for him to do. At our family reunion here in July, he hit the ceremonial opening tee shot on the first hole and of course, he hit the ball right down the middle of the fairway. To my knowledge, that was — at age 99 — his last golf shot. In particular, we want to thank Josh Holmes for encouraging our Dad to enter the 2014 Huntsman World Senior Games in St. George, UT, at age 97. And it is no surprise that he won a gold medal! Thank you Josh, and thank you golfing buddies for being such good friends to Joe Pickard.

There is a special couple here today that I think we all know: Carolyn and Dave Brown. Our family needs to thank Carolyn, our sister, and her husband Dave, for everything they have done for Betty and Joe Pickard, mom and dad, since they moved to Grand Junction in 2008. Carolyn and Dave watched over and cared for Joe and Betty and were best friends to them including day trips up to the Monument, or the Mesa, or the Book Cliffs; sharing meals at Grand Junction restaurants; libations at 5:00 pm at the Atrium or Snow Mesa Road; golf on Friday mornings; and cheering on the Broncos on football Sundays. They have simply been there for Mom and Dad every step of the way until dad’s final days. Thank you, Carolyn and Dave, for being the local “guardian angels” to our parents and doing everything you could to make their Grand Junction period secure, peaceful, and happy.

And finally, we have one last very big thank you to our mom and dad, Joe and Betty Pickard, for their gift to us of immeasurable value, which is the example of the very life they lived: two people who loved each other for 73 years as husband and wife, always together, never apart, building their story year by year of honest hard work, faithfulness, the joys of family, and ultimately the relaxed peacefulness of retirement. They have been like two stars in the sky always showing us the way, guiding us, inspiring us, teaching us, and comforting us. Mom and Dad, Betty and Joe, we love you, we thank you, and now, may you both rest in peace together.

sp

Emotion


Good vs evil

by scott pickard

Religion Religion in General Why do people kill in the name of religion?   Do you know what your religion’s position is on the origin of the universe and evolution? Tegmark   Does it damage children to teach them biblical creationism and deny biological evolution? Knowledge & Understanding Philosophy of religion good vs evil: Who knows what evil lurks in the  hearts of men? Shadow The priesthood, police force, and military force are massive, global communities that attract people who want to do good to make a difference in the world. But because they are so massive, they also attract a small percentage of imposters with bad intentions who infiltrate and hide within these professions to silently and secretly wreak havoc. Their leverage is magnified by many times because they operate in a environment of trust which enables them to ambush kids and adults they are sworn to serve and protect. This is a dark corner of human nature that will be very difficult to stamp out. So some priests will molest boys, some cops will occasionally kill people on the street, and soldiers will sometime rape women of their enemies. Our only hope is to be constantly vigilant and never give up on the ideal of giving every kid a chance grow up in a safe and loving environment without abuse, without violence, and without trauma, so that we stop planting the seeds of evil that may someday sprout again. sp > Parenting Religious experience Faith magazines: sojo superstition Religious phenomenology Theology Religious Doctrines and Dogmas Separation of Church and State: First Things religion in public life Study and classifications of religions Systems of Religious and Spiritual Belief Institutions & Practices Sacred Rites & Ceremonies Religious leaders and institutions Material manifestations of religious beliefs apocalypse: about | crisis planning: NISAC | doomsday: doomsday groups millennialism, mayan calendar | fantasy: Tokyo Genso | movies: I am Legend, Interstellar, Left Behind, Mad Max, The Day After, The Road, Water World spiritual leaders: past: Billy Graham, Confucious, Gandhi, Jesus Christ | present: dalai lama, Desmond Tutu, Mother Theresa, Pope books, movies, TV series: bible: C.S. Lewis | God Said, Man Said | How We Believe Shermer | J.R.R. Tolkien | One Second After Forstchen | Proof of Heaven Alexander | The Bible History Channel | The Gospel of the Flying Spaghetti Monster Henderson | The Varieties of Religious Experience James | What Happened to Sophie Beha

Who knows what evil lurks in the hearts of men? Shadow

The priesthood, police force, and military force are massive, global communities that attract people who want to do good to make a difference in the world. But because they are so massive, they also attract a small percentage of imposters with bad intentions who infiltrate and hide within these professions to silently and secretly wreak havoc. Their leverage is magnified by many times because they operate in a environment of trust which enables them to ambush kids and adults they are sworn to serve and protect. This is a dark corner of human nature that will be very difficult to stamp out. So some priests will molest boys, some cops will occasionally kill people on the street, and soldiers will sometime rape women of their enemies. Our only hope is to be constantly vigilant and never give up on the ideal of giving every kid a chance grow up in a safe and loving environment without abuse, without violence, and without trauma, so that we stop planting the seeds of evil that may someday sprout again.

- sp -

Faith is a Double-Edged Sword

[ from A Man of Faith by scott pickard ]

Faith is a double-edged sword.

Faith gives a person a certain power and confidence; a comfortable and secure belonging to a group that one trusts, and the fellowship that arises from that association.

But the sharper edge of the sword is that faith can also drive a person down a narrow path that does not respect other points of view, with a purpose that is unshakable. In many contexts this kind of determination can manifest as a good thing and it will deliver successful, sometimes incredible results.

But in some cases this “blind faith” can drive people to seriously harm others (even kill them) all in the name of their “faith practice,” to both non-believers outside their circle, but also members inside for purposes of enforcement.

The disastrous irony of blind faith is that it motivates people to do things that they believe are good, right, just, and necessary by the principles of the faith they follow. What can you say to a person like this to convince them otherwise?

I ask you, is there a more powerful and sharper double-edged sword in our world than blind faith?

- sp -