What is the hardest decision you have made in your lifetime?


[ t h i n k ]

Human Rights

Political Concepts Human Rights Should the world's moral responsibility to stop human atrocities rise above national sovereignty? sp > Big Questions What is modern slavery? Where should transgender children use the bathroom? Can enhanced interrogation (torture) ever be justified? freedom: Live Free or Die in general: lessons of history: The Guardians Pedersen > Geopolitics big ideas| oppression & struggle: Human Acts Kang | United Nations: Universal Declaration of Human Rights | dictatorships: Kim Jong-un | migrant workers: Cesar Chavez | torture: Break the Chain sp | CIA: Senate Report 2014 | ethiopia: Zone 9 | Geneva Conventions | Human Rights Watch: hrw | oral histories: Voice of Witness | UN Global Compact | modern trafficking: Human Trafficking Shelley | documentary: Harvest of Shame Murrow

Should the world’s moral responsibility to stop human atrocities rise above national sovereignty?

Should the world’s moral responsibility to stop human atrocities rise above national sovereignty? > Big Questions

What is modern slavery?

Where should transgender children use the bathroom?

Can enhanced interrogation (torture) ever be justified?

in general: lessons of history: The Guardians Pedersen > Geopolitics big ideas| oppression & struggle: Human Acts Kang | United Nations: Universal Declaration of Human Rights | dictatorships: Kim Jong-un | migrant workers: Cesar Chavez | torture: Break the Chain sp | CIA: Senate Report 2014 | ethiopia: Zone 9 | Geneva Conventions | Human Rights Watch: hrw | oral histories: Voice of Witness | UN Global Compact | modern trafficking: Human Trafficking Shelley | documentary: Harvest of Shame Murrow

Illinois Needs a Moon Shot

Biosphere Sustainability climate  |modeling | society | unintended Water touches everything. Permanence is the illusion of every age. To create a product that is safe, healthy, affordable, effective, and designed to be returned safely to nature or industry after use. Cradle-to-Cradle Can the company demonstrate to society and investors the link between sustainable business and corporate value? in general: overshoot: Limits to Growth Meadows > Modeling | unsustainability: Finland’s system of social benefits is unsustainable | energy innovation: Breakthrough Energy Coalition | Permanence is the illusion of every age. | carbon-neutral cities: carbon markets, Malmo, Sweden | forums & institutes: Institute for Climate and Sustainable Cities, theinstituteforsustainability, Worldwatch Institute | about: Sustainability Primer | buildings: Living Building Challenge | circular economy: about | globalization: telecoupling big ideas | measure ROI: The Green Scorecard Phillips | Collapse or Sustainability of Societies Motesharrei | Cradle to Cradle McDonough | Crowd Supply | design: Ideas and Integrities Fuller | farming: The Farm Bromfield | Sustainable Freshwater Aquaculture Romanowski | more

by Scott PIckard

For all of us that have a commitment to living out our years in Illinois, it’s a very scary proposition. I’ve got a State pension and who knows what could happen 5, 10, 20 years down the road. I guess I’m going to find out.

Illinois is in a slow bankruptcy burn. I’ve been inside companies that went bankrupt and Illinois has all the signs:

  • overwhelmed by crushing debt that grows daily
  • harassed by creditors from every angle that is slowly grinding the State down
  • a delusional hope springs eternal denial of the problem
  • citizen’s clueless to the real magnitude of the problem; or,
  • they simply don’t give a shit because there is nothing they can do about it and when it all blows up, they will just move on down the road
  • the problem is unfixable
  • the State is checked
  • the State is….. checkmate

The State will eventually hit the wall and either goes through a “simulated” bankruptcy; or, everything and everybody blows away like dust in the wind.

Chris Kennedy and other wealthy businessmen-politicians mean well but will only give us what the classic quote tells us and we all know deep down: “If you keep doing what you have always done, you will keep getting what you have always gotten.” But, I do admire that Kennedy et al want a crack at the State’s Fiscal Gordian Knot and are chomping at the bit to kick out Governor Bruce Rauner on his billion-dollar country club ass.

The politicians will NEVER solve the State’s Fiscal Gordian Knot in our lifetimes. Only the people can solve this by:

  • firing every sitting politician all the way up to the governor
  • hiring a third party turnaround trustee-manager person that does not live in Illinois and is clean of any conflicts of interest
  • have the person report directly to the people
  • have the person manage a “moonshot” competition to develop a 50-year plan to reach financial sustainability
  • any person and/or team on the planet can submit their moonshot plan
  • have the people use “approval voting” to vote for the best moonshot plan
  • the winning moonshot team gets $100M paid out over 50 years contingent on performance of the plan over time
  • while the plan is playing out, re-engineer and revolutionize Illinois government so this never happens again

All you radical-thinking, clear-thinking people out there, here’s your chance to make your mark, never have to work again (unless you want to), save Illinois, and in the process design a revolutionary financial roadmap for the rest of the world because we’re all going to need it.

Crazy, you say?

Have you got a better idea?

- sp -

Fourth Industrial Revolution

Human Society Production and Utilization of Wealth  Are we on the cusp of a Fourth Industrial Revolution?  Will it be a force for good or evil?  Will it provide new opportunities for all, or will it exacerbate inequalities? Davos ‘16 > Randomness/unintended Economic Theory and Systems Economic Theory: index of economic freedom Economic Systems Historical development of economic systems Capitalism Centrally-planned systems Appraising economic systems The Consumer and the Market Scarcity, utility, and value: behavioral economics: | Valuation Consumer behavior: Buying Decisions | inelasticity Markets: markets hate uncertainty Price system in capitalist economies Organization of Production and Distribution Organization of the production of goods Marketing and Merchandising Inputs of the productive process Institutions that facilitate business formation, production, output Money Currency & Exchange Stock exchanges: AI Banks International: Bank for International Settlements BIS economic statistics business organization stock markets: Volatility Index (VIX) fear index Agricultural economics International trade Government’s role in production & distribution: privatization Methods of business organization Advertising & Promotion Distribution of risk Consumer credit: Don’t use a credit card for a loan sp Distribution of Income and Wealth the rich get richer and the poor get poorer Matthew Effect Distribution by categories of the population: Forbes 400 | gini coefficient How government affects the distribution Capitalism Taxation Laffer Curve postulates that no tax revenue will be raised at the extreme tax rates of 0% and 100% and that there must be at least one rate where tax revenue would be a non-zero maximum. Poverty Macroeconomics National income and employment theory misery index unemployment: U3 and U6 Intl. equilibrium and disequilibrium Business cycles Inflation and deflation key indicators: monetary velocity Economic Growth and Planning Nature and causes of economic growth Planning for economic growth and stability Government Finance Growth  books, forums, journals: innovation: The Fourth Industrial Revolution Schwab | behavioral: Misbehaving Thaler | Capital in the Twenty-First Century Piketty big ideas | Stealth of Nations by Neuwirth | The Mystery of Capital De Soto | The Wealth of Nations Smith | Wall Street Journal | World Economic Forum Davos

Davos 2016: Fourth Industrial Revolution

 

Decisions


CEOs Out of Bounds

Social Organization and Change Leadership Lead by example.  Can companies still rely on a single individual at the top to handle the complexity and uncertainty of the global environment? in general: accountability: The buck stops here. Truman | anti-leadership: despotism | bios: Amazing People Library | greatness: about | journals: Leader to Leader | narcissistic leaders | team of rivals | toxic leaders | training: disneyinstitute, Salzburg Global Seminar       charisma: research: measurement | visualization empowerment: thinkingmanagers | quotes: woopidoo | self-management: morningstarco | situational leadership heroes: As a leader, are you passionate and focus on a few key principles which you will not sacrifice under any circumstances?  How strong is your willpower?  Does your willpower have staying power?  Can you weather a long storm?  Can you effectively communicate your key principles?  Are you getting the message across?  Do you strive for generosity, nobility, humility, and strength of character? | recognition: Carnegie Hero Fund | Finding A Hero Amid Fading Memories humility: The true leader sits side-by-side with his brother and sister, content that his fame and fortune is a bonus in his daily life, and never expecting special treatment but always appreciative when it comes his way. sp wisdom: A skillful leader can use a light touch to solve a vexing problem. Miller | clinical wisdom nursing | quotes: www.wisdomquotes.com | National Urban Fellows books, articles, forums: CEOs Out of Bounds sp > CEO | Good Boss, Bad Boss Sutton | Heroes Johnson | Heroes of History Durant | How to Win Friends and Influence People Carnegie | Leadership Ensembles Thomas | Made to Stick Heath | Making Your Case: The Art of Persuading Judges Scalia | On Becoming a Leader Bennis | On Leadership Gardner | Renaissance Weekend | Start with Why Sinek | Strengths-Based Leadership | The Age of Lincoln Burton | The First 90 Days Watkins | The Last Lecture Pausch | The Little Big Things Peters | The Starfish and the Spider Brafman | transparency: Maverick!, TED Talk Semler big ideas | Tribes: We Need You to Lead Us Godin | What to Ask the Person in the Mirror Kaplan

 

by scott pickard

Sport plays an important part in the lives of many business leaders. Nothing can make the juices flow like sinking a 30-foot birdie putt to win the match or setting a personal record in the local 10K run. Risking, winning and losing, playing, pushing personal limits – all are tonics for the chief executive, but they require “getting in the game.”

For Dick Jorgensen, Red Cashion, and Tom Dooley, getting in the game was a way of life. During their days as NFL Referees,  they were chief executives of successful corporations, but on the weekends they exchanged their business suits for “zebra suits” to become NFL referees. Whether on the field or off, these CEOs shared an uncommon passion to perform their best.

Dick Jorgensen: Banking on the Blitz

Dick Jorgensen had the distinction of having been the head referee for 1990’s Super Bowl XXIV. It was the pinnacle of a 22-year career as an NFL referee when one considers that the officials on Super Bowl Sunday are voted the best at their position by the NFL.

Head Referee Dick Jorgensen (#60) follows San Francisco quaterback Joe Montana (#16) and the rest of the action at Sperbowl XXIV in 1990.

When he was not watching Joe Montana fade back for the bomb, Jorgensen was president of Marine Bank in Champaign, IL, a banking affiliate of the Marine Corporation with over $1 billion in assets. The bank always supported Dick’s other life as an NFL referee, as banks generally support the active community involvement of all employees.

At 56 (in 1990) and coming off recent back surgery, Dick moved a little slower than he did as captain of the University of Wisconsin’s basketball team.  He was concerned about his upcoming annual NFL physical and stress test, but he was determined to pass. He daily stretched, swam, and lifted weights – whatever it took to ensure he would get another shot at a Super Bowl. Having participated in Super Bowls VIII, XV, and XXIV, he didn’t want to pass up another opportunity to be part of “the immensity of the game.”

The rewards of a Super Bowl experience, however, aren’t without cost. The pressures of balancing a banking career and an active family life while on the road for the NFL were substantial, especially for the family left behind each weekend. “But once the kickoff comes and I get into the flow of the game,” asserted Jorgensen, “all the pressure is off. It’s exhausting, but mentally refreshing.”

Tom Dooley: Constructing a Game Plan

Tom Dooley, former CEO of R.T. Dooley Construction, says his 14 years of working out problems on an NFL football field helped him work out problems in business. “On the football field,” he observed, “you have a set of rules and a solution.” Dooley was proud of the fact that in all his years as CEO, he never had to retain an attorney to solve a legal problem!

“Nothing is black and white in business,” continued Dooley. “Everything is a compromise. On the football field, it is black and white. I can flush out every thought in the world when I’m on that field.” And like Dick Jorgensen, Tom Dooley got that same physical exhaustion but mental freshness after each game.

To make it possible for Tom to work weekends for the NFL and keep his business under control, he surrounded himself with “people smarter than I am.” And what was good for the boss was good for the troops. Business shut down every day at 11:30 am so employees could get in a vigorous noon workout at the local YMCA (the company paid every employee’s membership fee).

Dooley believed strongly in being “the best you can be.” After a lifetime of setting goals and achieving them, he still had one in his sights – to work a Super Bowl as head referee. He had a taste of Super Bowl action as a linesman at Super Bowl XV, Eagles vs Raiders, in 1981. But characteristic of every NFL referee, Dooley wanted a shot at the No. 1 position.

Red Cashion: A Variable Life

On April 21, 1990, Texas Independence Day, Red Cashion had the honor of being keynote speaker at Texas A&M’s “annual muster,” following in the footsteps of the mayor of San Antonio, the governor of Texas, and Ike Eisenhower. For a Texan, especially one that lived and worked in College Station (Aggie country), this was as big an honor as being referee at Super Bowl XX, Bears vs. Patriots, in 1986.

Speaking before students, athletes, and business people went with the territory for this NFL referee who was also chairman of ANCO insurance which he co-founded in 1966. The challenges and lessons of business and sport were inseparable for Cashion, helping him develop what he called “presence.”

Red enjoyed “being in the center of the action.” It took him 20 years of refereeing in junior high through college ranks before being accepted into the NFL where he officiated from 1972 – 1996 (25 years).

Obviously, the pressure of officiating wasn’t a problem for Cashion, having been at it for so long. He enjoyed keeping himself in shape through competitive handball. “Frankly,” he says, “I enjoy the annual NFL physical and stress test.”

The greater challenge for Cashion was making the right decision under pressure. Being an NFL referee helped him develop confidence in himself and his decisions, a quality employees respected.

When he returned each Monday following an NFL game, football was the topic of the day. Employees always greet him with questions about the game. Although Cashion admitted that “after a while, you forget which city you were in,” he will never forget being head referee in Super Bowls XX (1986, Bears vs Patriots) and XXX (1996, Cowboys vs. Steelers).

* * *

Note from Scott Pickard: “I wrote this feature article under assignment to Chief Executive magazine and it was subsequently published in September, 1990.  Sadly, Dick Jorgensen passed away in October, 1990.  He was a well-known personality and highly-respected leader in Champaign, IL.”

- sp -

LinkedIn posts (writing)

Particular Arts / literature Writing a writer writes in general: I write to discover what I know. O’Connor | automation: Babel Generator | buy/sell: storiad | collaboration: mixedink, The Writing Squad | content-as-a-service: Structured Information | contests: write a novel in a month |diaries: Grownups Read Things They Wrote as Kids > Radio | editing: scribendi | freelance: contently | LinkedIn: The Power of LinkedIn Posts sp | query letters | software tools: scrivener | teaching kids to write: boomwriter, 826valencia | whitepapers: template | word/character count: Text Mechanic, Word Count Tools grammar & references: citing sources: endnote, www.noodletools.com/quickcite | Common English Errors: www.wsu.edu/~brians/errors/index.html | Guide to Grammar & Writing: http://grammar.ccc.commnet.edu/grammar | Presentation Tips: http://wps.ablongman.com/ab_public_speaking_2 | Press Release Guide: www.press-release-writing.com quotes: The hardest part of writing is the first word. sp |Bartlett's Quotations: www.bartleby.com/100 | Brainy Quote: www.brainyquote.com style guides: Citation Styles: www.bedfordstmartins.com/online/citex.html | Economist Style Guide: www.economist.com/research/StyleGuide | Elements of Style: www.bartleby.com/141/index.html | skills: 15 Online Resources to Upgrade Your Writing Skills Crosby  vocabulary : Can improving your vocabulary improve your life? (a) formulate your ideas better; (b) write better papers, emails and business letters; (c) speak more precisely and persuasively; (d) comprehend more of what you read; (e) read faster because you comprehend better; (f) get better grades in school; (g) score higher on tests like the SAT, GRE, LSAT and GMAT; (h) perform better at job interviews and conferences; (i) sell yourself, your services, and your products better; (j) be more effective and successful at your job voice recognition: iPhone: siri | nuance blogs, books, movies, portals: A Moveable Feast Hemingway | On the Boulevard sp | screen writing: Barton Fink Coen | The Elements of Style Strunk | writers: Mr. Gwyn | Writer’s Digest | Writing a Winning Book Proposal