A Values Manifesto for the American Worker

Philosophy Values (Principles) I never complain about what I don’t have, but appreciate what I do have. sp There are three things people consistently wish on their death bed: •     I wish I had not worked so hard •     I wish I had stayed in touch with my family and friends •     I wish I had let myself be happier Here I stand; I can do no other. Luther Can nice guys finish first?  How visible are values among management and employees? in general: pro/con: smart spaces & trigger warnings | civility: Golden Rule | Public Service Announcements (PSAs): VALUES.com | corporate responsibility: Hilton | humility: Actions speak louder than words. | kindness: www.behospitable.com, hellohumankindness, suspended coffee | persuasion: nudge technology | money: money priming | fairness | Tragedy of the Commons: about books, poems, articles, reports: kids can make a difference: Hoot Hiassen > Families | essay: Life Without Principle Thoreau | justice: Go Set a Watchman Lee | beliefs: This I Believe Allison | civility: Choosing Civility Forni | cooperation over self-interest: The Penguin and the Leviathan Benkler | evolution: The Cooperation Instinct Ohlson | humility and strength: If Kipling | life: The Prophet Gibran | resilience: Bend, Not Break Fu

by Scott Pickard

The American Worker is the true and authentic engine of the U.S. economy: hard working, innovative, unafraid of risk, productive, efficient, can-do, get the job done. We go to work every day to build, repair, maintain, clean, deliver, teach, inspire, heal, protect, invent, design, create, entertain, serve, manufacture, and on and on. We are the ones who actually get things done.

And according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (2015), the 133 million American Independent Workers (non-union, “employed at will”) make up almost 90% of the U.S. workforce. But unlike our fellow union workers, American Workers are not bound together by an organizational structure with rules and dues; but rather, the resilience and power and spirit of the American Worker is guided and motivated by a set of values that we have shared for as long as there have been workers.

You might call it, A Values Manifesto for the American Worker.

We are loyal to our employers and owners

Every non-government job can be traced back to one person (entrepreneur) who had the guts and confidence to take the personal risk required to start and grow a business that created jobs. Therefore, we believe owners make the rules of their work domain because they take the personal risk and shoulder the responsibility to make our payroll every month. There is nothing stopping us from becoming owners ourselves and building our own organizations, culture, and values as we each see fit. It’s a free country, as we have always believed, so we each have the self-determination to decide and act as we choose.

We have always been willing to sacrifice and go with less for the company we work for if tough times demanded it. We generally do not file grievances or lawsuits. We work out issues with our employers face-to-face. We have always been loyal to our employers, unless of course, that loyalty is not reciprocated. We can always choose to walk out the door to a new and potentially better opportunity.

We are ready to do what needs to be done

Like most people, we do just about any task at home to take care of our families. We are prepared to do the same at work because it is, we think, the natural instinct of people to pitch in with a team, solve problems, and get things done wherever we find a need or whenever we are asked to help.

We believe arbitrary quotas and constraints that limit productivity go against the grain of the basic human impulse to continuously improve, go faster, work harder, produce more, and increase quality. We simply do as much as we can as efficiently as we can each workday while maintaining standards of quality.

We do not accept payment to not work. We generally do not need or collect unemployment. We reemploy ourselves almost immediately if we lose a job because our strong survival instincts drive us to always be prepared for adversity.

We accept the responsibility to survive on our own

We believe that in the working world, it is up to each worker to take full responsibility for their continuity of employment and to take care of their families. We believe that once a worker accepts that responsibility, they will take the actions to survive each and every day instead of waiting for someone else to take care of them. We believe that to enjoy the benefits of a free marketplace, each American Worker must own this responsibility.

Leaders (especially presidents) who politicize so-called workers’ rights and entitlements do a tremendous disservice to society by continuously promising what the nation does not have the cash to pay for without creating more debt. That kind of thinking and rhetoric is fueling a slow-burning bankruptcy in our cities, states, and nation.

We believe that we come into this world with no absolute entitlements except for what our parents can provide for us until we are capable of providing for ourselves the quality of life, safety, and happiness that we all seek and that we each earn with our own hands, minds, and hearts.

American Workers are survivors and take nothing for granted.

We care for those less fortunate than us

We believe that survival of the fittest does not mean that those less fit are left to struggle. We believe that if each community cares for their own family, friends, neighbors and citizens that are less fortunate, then we’ll all be okay.

We believe that we should all pitch in to support those that need some extra help as long as everyone else helps out in proportion to their means. We know that to maintain the continuity of work, a person must stay healthy, but some of us face adverse health issues and emergencies and disasters that come suddenly with no warning over which we have no control. The American Worker will be there to help. We make contributions to help the poor, chronically sick, disabled, and victimized. We do what we can to share and help out others that need our help, knowing they will do the same for us when the time comes.

However, we do believe that good health is enhanced by our attitudes and effort and determination to keep ourselves healthy. We don’t want to be sick, so generally we don’t get sick, and we don’t take sick days. When you hire the American Worker, you get 100% uptime. We live life to be healthy, to work hard and to play hard.

We always spend less than we earn

Wherever we are in our work journey and the pay we receive, we live within our means. How can an American Worker financially sustain themselves and their families any other way?

We pay all our bills. We pay our proportionate fair share of income taxes.

We generally do not file for personal bankruptcy because we do everything in our power to prevent it. We believe in resilience. We accept that the randomness of life and the axe of accountability will eventually strike us all, and when it does, we take our medicine and deal with it. We don’t believe democratic societies can or should bail out every person or organization no matter how too big to fail they are. We are skeptical of too big to fail bailouts when the loudest voices are coming from those that stand to lose the most wealth in their portfolios.  The American Worker believes in one set of rules for all, both the haves and the have-nots.

We don’t expect anything free from anybody. We want to earn what we can based on our individual ability to earn; otherwise, it has no value to us.

We know what we are worth and we speak for ourselves

We do not require third-party organizations to establish our fair market value as workers. We rely on the marketplace to be a very efficient (if not brutal) system for establishing fair market value of the American Worker. Our leverage is our experience, skill, value, and the freedom of self-determination (i.e., you can take this job and shove it.)

We do not pay money to another person to sit at the negotiation table with our employers on our behalf. We are individually responsible for that task, and we save the money to invest directly in our professional and personal development.

The American Workers’ market value over the years has been, plus or minus, fair. It has never been propped up or guaranteed by a contract, lockout, walk out, picket line, strike, sickout, blue flu, quota, restriction, injunction, entitlement, you name it. We give our employer the benefit of the doubt that our pay is what our employers can reasonably afford for the business to be financially sustainable for the long term.It’s a free country, as we have always said, so if we cannot work out a mutually-acceptable level of pay, we can always go elsewhere or start a business of our own.

We always land on our feet

We don’t assume that any job can last forever. The world is global, competitive, and volatile, and we deal with that reality by preparing ourselves and always having a backup plan. We almost always remain employed but when we do lose a job, we are prepared to drop back a rung or two on the ladder (if need be) to rebuild ourselves with more experience and education/training, most of it low-cost to free in today’s online lifetime-learning world. When it comes to providing for and protecting our families, we never rest and we never give up.

We believe “chance favors the prepared mind,” and it also favors the prepared American Worker who is relentless about lifetime learning so that she or he is always employable at any age.

We make no excuses for adversity that inevitably will come our way. We go to the library, get online, and for free we learn and train to qualify for all kinds of good jobs on this planet. We don’t wait for an organization to train us and find us another job. We go get it on our own. We make getting a job a full-time job. Our attitude is to wake up at dawn and not come home until we find a job. That’s not to say that getting a job is sometimes hard, but we wake up each day with that attitude, day after day, for as long as it takes to get that next job.

We respect Organized American Labor and are appreciative of their contributions

We respect and appreciate what union workers have done for our country and the good job that they continue to do today. We believe it is critical in this world for independent and union workers to stand side-by-side to get things done.

But the fact is, American Independent Workers comprise 90% of the U.S. workforce. We are the independent, self-sufficient, lean and mean American Workers driven by several key principles:

  • Subsidiarity: We believe in the Principle of Subsidiarity which says that matters ought to be handled by the smallest, lowest, and least centralized competent authority.
  • Trustworthiness: We are skeptical of the trustworthiness of all things BIG: Government, Corporate Business; Nonprofit Organizations, even Religions. Fundamentally, we believe that wherever wealth and power are concentrated, it inevitably becomes the breeding ground for unethical opportunistic behavior, greed, cronyism, corruption, and fraud. History driven by human behavior predictably repeats itself in this regard.
  • Self-Determination: While adhering to the Rule of Law, we never hand over our individual self-determination to any person or organization if we don’t have to.

The American Worker is the Economy

The American Worker is the true engine of OUR ECONOMY which is not a politician’s or a government’s or a corporation’s or a party’s economy. It has always been and will always be, OUR ECONOMY, and the politicians are hired by and report to the American Worker. No one person (or President) has all the answers and the power and the money and the time to unilaterally lift our country’s economy up and forward in the face of increasing global competition.

Only each individual American Worker can make an impact starting at 8:00 am tomorrow morning, magnified by the strength and power and resilience of values shared among 133 million American Workers. We need not wait another 4-8 years for the federal government to come to the rescue. We, the American Workers, know what to do and together we can change the world for the better, right now.

Nose to the grindstone, let’s go get it done, just as we always have.

sp

Co-Working


Pop-Ups and “Citizen-Sourcing”

by scott pickard

Tom Peters, famous author of In Search of Excellence, coined the phrase “fast failures” which simply means corporations using modest amounts of capital to let employees rapidly test out new concepts, versus following a traditional deliberate corporate process to vet new product and service ideas. Fast forwarding to today, the idea of the “pop-up” has steadily been gaining traction in the retail and restaurant sectors as a way to quickly test the market, introduce new products and services, and gain some quick local market awareness.

When you think about it, the pop-up has been around for a long time, we just called it a booth at a tradeshow. What’s different now is the pop-up can happen anywhere, especially outside where people are walking, browsing, and congregating. In the tradeshow model you had to attract the people to your booth (one of hundreds) in a big event center. In the pop-up model you embed your story where the people are and often you are the only show at that location.

The pop-up is not just for big corporations. Any organization and any individual can pop-up their story on a budget that ranges from a table at a flea market in a mall, to an open-air stand at an art fair in a parking lot, to something more elaborate whether it is indoors or outdoors. The pop-up enables rapid prototyping (and fast failures), market introduction and awareness, brainstorming, customer feedback, crowd sourcing (“citizen-sourcing”), and more. And because it is such a cost-effective technique, we should encourage and enable pop-ups in our communities as much as possible because what we need in our communities is new thinking that leads to new companies and new jobs which can help backfill the substantial job losses we are experiencing by disruption across all sectors.

Just to pick one example, consider libraries which are being disrupted across the United States because of the digital revolution and declining state and municipal budgets. Public libraries across the nation are struggling to figure out how to redefine the mission of their libraries and develop a sustainable financial model.

The “elephant in the room” that people are afraid to talk about or step forward on is the question of do we still need to allocate that much space for books-on-shelves? It is such a revered and emotional tradition (some say “right” or “entitlement”) to have books-on-shelves in expansive quiet spaces, that some library directors have already lost their jobs trying to move in a different direction. But it will happen! We don’t need as much space allocated for books-on-shelves as we used to, so we will have to repurpose some amount of that library space and potentially have some of the space generate revenues which will help support the library.

A specific example of this is our own public library that has a 40,000 square-foot basement which is empty. The basement of our public library is nicer than the basement in my 90-year old home: well lit, dry, high ceilings, broadband wireless, plenty of power, smooth concrete floor, plenty of books and coffee and conference rooms and restrooms upstairs, warm in the winter and cool in the summer. That’s a lot of space to be doing nothing when the library has been running a deficit budget for the last five years.

Why not mobilize the power of the crowd (the library patrons and the community at large) by letting them pop-up their ideas in the basement?

  • Design lab
  • Media lab
  • Art studio
  • Dance studio
  • Co-working area for budding entrepreneurs
  • Fablab, makery, hackerspace
  • And the list goes on…

Basement of the library is an excellent place for a pop-up fablab.

Give them some of that empty underutilized space, support them however you can, and unleash the creative energy of citizen-sourcing in your community because no single library director or board of trustees has the all-knowing crystal ball to build a roadmap to the future for their libraries. I have much more confidence in the power of diverse thinking from citizen-sourcing than I have in a library director either afraid of losing his or her job or stubborn to change; or a politicized board of trustees nervous about community blowback. I was on our library board so I’ve seen this group-think dynamic from the inside.

The library is only one of many institutions which are being disrupted (big university is another, for example) which we need to address, but we are failing our communities if we don’t fully utilize the power of citizen-sourcing.

Pop-ups are a great way to mobilize and tap the creative and problem-solving power in our communities and get on with it!

- sp -

Co-Working Space

by scott pickard

A co-working space in a library might look something like this:

coworkspace

The co-working program can offer the following:

  •  shared-office space:
    • parking
    • desk, chair, power
    • wireless broadband
    • cafe
    • library card and books, lots of books
    • conference rooms
    • bathrooms
    • comfortable easy chairs for reading and napping
  • a place to connect with other motivated:
    • entrepreneurs
    • small business owners
    • hackers
    • social-impact organizations
  • help with:
    • business support
    • fund-raising
    • looking for mentors
  • simply a collaborative space to brainstorm, design, create

 sp

 

Evolution of the office

by scott pickard

Preparations are all already underway to celebrate the 40th anniversary of the introduction of the cubicle into the American office scene. The man called the father of the cubicle — Bob — was asked to characterize the legacy of his brainchild and he said, “It seemed like a good idea at the time.”

The week-long festivities which some are calling the “Super Bowl of Office Furniture” will be held in Toledo, Ohio, which has the largest concentration of Red Roof Inns in the nation. Events will include workshops on cube art, hospitality cubes, a tradeshow showing the latest cubicle designs with a sneak preview of the industry’s new experimental models. The week ends with a gala dinner /dance hosted by once-good-golfer David Duval.

Not everyone is happy with the cubicle, though, and the discontent has sparked a revolution among office thought leaders promoting fresh ideas, such as: (a) telecommuting, the “second office”; (b) sprawling out your papers and laptop and muffin with bits of cream cheese on your table while talking annoyingly loud on your cell phone in a Starbucks, the “third office”; and now (3) the “fourth office,” TBD.

The “fourth office”

Just what the hell is it?  It’s just out of our reach, but visionaries have theories as to how the “fourth” will manifest itself.

“I see it as an office of the mind,” explains Dart Maxn, head curator of miscellaneous things at Milan’s Museum of Heavy Industrial Objects. “No paper, no calendars, no nothing! You carry everything around in your head. If it’s important you will remember it; if not, then you won’t remember it. It’s nature’s perfect system of prioritization.”

“For instance, if you miss an important meeting with your most important client, then you won’t get the sale. So in the fourth, companies will have smaller revenues but there will be no need for wastebaskets.”

One radical idea has been developed by Jason Calpt, parking lot security guard at a Fortune 500 Corporation, in charge of fixing the lift-gates when they break.

“It dawned on me one day that all those cars in the corporate parking lot were sitting empty all day and then whammo, it came to me: every car in the lot is an office!  Think about it. You’ve got space, privacy, HVAC, tunes, and adjustable leather seats.”

in general: boxoffice460 | capital planning/asset management system: www.vfa.com | CCTV: Agility Video | search: www.globalofficesearch.biz, regus | shared facilities: wework | virtual office: www.intelligentoffice.com | working at Google: www.youtube.com/watch?v=aOZhbOhEunY facilities management: How often does the company evaluate the cost-effectiveness of its branch office(s)? | automated Irrigation: www.hydropoint.com | on-demand asset lifecycle management: www.axispointe.com | quantified office: Robin used: heavy equipment: www.ironplanet.com questions for landlord: How long have you been renting to the company?  How many square feet does the company rent from you?  Does the company make its rent payments on time?  Have you ever had to contact the company to get your payment?  Does the company maintain the property in good condition?  Would you rent to the company again? books: Corporate Interiors Yee | The Other Office: Creative Workplace Design Stewart

Make a statement where you work by being that person always first to arrive and last to leave the office.

Tickets to the 40th anniversary of the cubicle will be available soon.

sp

How to get help with a patent if you’re a first-time inventor

by scott pickard

The first thing I would do is identify all the local startup business incubators and/or co-working facilities in your community, especially the ones that seem to be the best fit to your idea.  Usually these places have an open-door policy that allows people to come in with new ideas that have the potential to later on develop into new products/businesses. They’ve got their finger on the pulse of all the local attorneys who provide patent services, and in some cases you can get a sit-down session with one of these attorneys at no cost. See how far you can get without having to spend any money.

Another thing you should do is attend an entrepreneur’s mixer(s) at these incubators and do some social networking with the entrepreneurs and staff because they’ve been down this path before and they will know who to contact and who not to contact.

Reseearch Parks Co-Working Space THE CO-WORKING MANIFESTO inside the corporation, i compete against you, you compete against me, every person for themselves. inside the co-working mashup, you do not compete against me, I do not compete against you, rather, it is the Cheers effect: everybody knows your name, you are happy to see me, I’m happy to see you, you are interested in my ideas, I’m interested in yours, you want to help me, I want to help you, you learn from me, I learn from you, together, we design and build cool things that make an impact in people’s lives. sp in general: about | multidisciplinary mashups: Geekdom | pay-it-forward: gangplank | revenue: $50/sf/year hackerspaces: bio: biocurious, genspace.org | Case Western: thinkbox | hackerdojo | history: L0pht | hostels | how-to: www.mindbites.com, eHow, www.wonderhowto.com | makezine | 1000 Ideas for Creative Reuse by Garth Johnson | tinkering: about, Artisan & Fab Lab, tinkering school incubators and accelerators: Chicago: 1871 | China: innovation-works | corporations: When Big Companies Support Start-ups… Mitra | food & restaurant: lacocinaf | FREE!: commnexus | health applicatons: rockhealth | IT: galvanize Denver | Orange County: OCTANe.org | tandementrepreneurs | USC: Viterbi Startup Garage | US-China: innospring.net | virtual: Incubator-In-A-Box libraries: My idea is to convert the basement of our library (40,000 sf, polished concrete floor, high ceiling, dry, well-lit, broadband wireless, plenty of power, and empty!) into a fablab, makery, hackerspace, design studio, and other creative uses that our patrons can come up with…..more sp | Launch Fishers articles and books : aStore | A Comprehensive Guide to Business Incubation Erlewine | Start Small: Why Tinkerers Get Things Done McGuinness | Startup Nation clusters Entrepreneurship | New Products | Collaboration

tapping the wisdom of the entrepreneurial crowd at your local co-working facility

sp

Closing the Innovation Gap

“Our short-sightedness has led to major challenges — dependence on oil, climate change, health care, and national security — that threaten our economy and quality of life. Each challenge also brings opportunities — if we give innovation the attention it deserves.”

Engineering and R&D Research and Development  search What’s likely to be the “next big thing?” What might be the most fertile areas for innovation? Where should countries and companies invest their limited research funds? What technology areas are a company’s competitors pursuing? How are projects chosen for R&D?  What is R&D’s past record for successful completion of projects to budget and schedule?  When does management expect products will reach the market from research projects currently underway?  Is the company working smart to optimize the FDA approval process?  How would management rate the company’s R&D operations against its competitors?  How well does R&D integrate its work with marketing?  End user?  Engineering?  Production?  Is R&D’s major emphasis applied or basic research?  How much do the company’s projected financials depend upon successful new products developed by R&D?  Does the company effectively protect the secrecy of R&D projects?  Is there sufficient federal financing to support R&D at adequate levels?  What is the company’s approach towards capitalization of R&D expenses?  Is management well informed of R&D activities?  Are the company’s research facilities adequate?  How confident is management that R&D’s team and plan will lead to the right product(s) at the right time?  Has management evaluated the cost-effectiveness of shifting some portion of R&D expenditures and operations to external sources? (a) venture capital funds; (b) R&D alliances; (c) government funding such as ATP in general: Chance favors the prepared mind. Pasteur | citations: zotero | crowd funding: experiment | design of experiments: about | electronic lab notebooks: www.intellichem.com | ethics: Integrity in Research and Publication | europe: cordis | www.evaluatingresearchcenters.com | incentivization: prize challenges | magazines: rdmag | matching problems with solutions: www.innocentive.com | molecular imaging: www.visenmedical.com | networks: internet2 | patents: mapping | pharmaceutical R&D: www.teranode.com, wingu | poster template | rent & read: deepdyve | research universities: www.aau.edu | videos: labtv academic: The traditional metric of academic capital is citations. | Should researchers make their source code available when submitting a research paper to a peer-reviewed scientific journal? | bio template: publications.ca | data sharing: figshare | funding opportunity announcements: grantforward | impact: h-index | news: futurity | scientific literature: Action Science Explorer | Association of Research Libraries | open access, peer-reviewed joournals: peerj, plusone.org  | social networking: academia.edu | Search: academic.research.microsoft federal labs: Argonne National Laboratory: www.anl.gov | Idaho National Laboratory: www.inl.gov | Kansas City Plant: www.kcp.com | Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory: www.lbl.gov | Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory: www.llnl.gov | Los Alamos National Laboratory: www.lanl.gov | National Renewable Energy Laboratory: www.nrel.gov | Oak Ridge National Laboratory: www.ornl.gov | Pacific Northwest National Laboratory: www.pnl.gov | Sandia National Laboratory: www.sandia.gov | Y-12 National Security Complex Heilmeier Catechism: What are you trying to do? Articulate your objectives using absolutely no jargon.  How is it done today, and what are the limits of current practice?  What's new in your approach and why do you think it will be successful?  Who cares?  If you're successful, what difference will it make?  What are the risks and the payoffs?  How much will it cost?  How long will it take?  What are the midterm and final "exams" to check for success? | The Heilmeier Catechism Visits the University sp lab management: workflow management: accelrys | software: quartzy free multidisciplinary research: What are the top ten actions that Congress, the federal government, state governments, research universities and others could take to assure the ability of the American research university to maintain the excellence in research and doctoral education needed to help the United States compete, prosper, and achieve national goals for health, energy, the environment, and security in the global community of the 21st century? Stanford | synthesis centers: science incubators | World Café charrette translation of project results: To what extent do the research issues being pursued relate to challenges along the pathway towards achieving meaningful use?  How effective are the methods used to accelerate translation of research into application(s)?  To what extent has the project identified the salient, potentially breakthrough challenges?  Are innovative research methods being applied to meet the ultimate research agenda?  What problems have been encountered in implementing all of the required features of the project?  What relationships has the project established with industry to facilitate the translation of the research? | funding: action science: definitions | proof-of-concept books and articles: Breakthrough Stefik | Closing the Innovation Gap Estrin | Evaluating Research Centers & Institutes for Success! Tash | Scientists Popularizing Science: Characteristics/Impact of TED Presenters Sugimoto Innovation | Crowd | Science | Collaboration | Atoms | IP | News | Big Data

Whitehouse Maker Faire 2014

To celebrate America’s students and entrepreneurs who are inventing the future with new technologies and techniques, the President is hosting the first-ever White House Maker Faire on Wednesday, June 18. The event will feature Makers, innovators, and entrepreneurs of all ages who are using cutting-edge tools to bring their ideas to life.

Development of Technology / Human Work DIY do it yourself White House Maker Faire  search in general: democratization of making | about | autos: local motors design | bicycles: sandwhichbikes | big data: clearstorydata | blocks: marble plans | bookmark: post-it sp | cakes: fondant | comics: I Draw Comics Sketchbook & Reference Guide | crafts: craft production, craftsy learn | digital designs: thingiverse | film: swedefest | fold tee shirt | forums: Boy/Girl Scouts, diynetwork, instructables, makerfaire | furniture: AtFAB, sketchchair | global village construction set: opensourceecology | guides: snapguide | hardware: Raspberry Pi |  homegrown food | houses: WikiHouse | knife kit | learn/teach: Boy Scouts, skillshare | legal documents: rocketlawyer | MacGyver | magazines & portals: familyhandyman, Makeshift | mapping: balloon mapping | marketing collaterals: makrplace | online bookstore: aStore | planners | projects: diynetwork | screen printing: Chicago Printmakers Collaborative, lumi.co | surfboards: mobile classroom | tee shirts: snorgtees, threadless | trading algorithms: quantopian | wall decals: stickytiki | woodblock prints: etchpop curation: art: articurate electronics: circuits: Circuit Scribe |hardware platform: teagueduino | infrared cameras: flir, infrared | keyboard: makeymakey | kits: Evil Mad Scientist | parts: radioshack, sparkfun | soldering: MightyOhm | spectrometry kit | synthesizer: littleBits hobbies & toys: cardboard animals: kineticcreatures | comic strip: magnetcomic | dollhouse | Free Universal Construction Kit | model airplanes: paper, thequadshot | robots: Moss repairs: carmd, ifixit | waterproofing: getflexseal tools & machines: fablab | laser cutting: epiloglaser | shop class: Shop Class as Soulcraft Crawford | windmills | zen and the art videos: cloud: animoto, shakr | film thyself: swivl | hyperlapse: Google Street View | mobile: directr.co | monetize: pivotshare | tracking shots: cinetics articles, blogs, books, magazines, portals: Animoto Video Platform for the Non-Professional sp | Make | ReadyMade 100 Project Manual | Handmade Nation Levine | The American Boy's Handy B