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I Know You Know

I Know You Know

Big Picture / History / World Since 1920 / United States Since 1920 / Dystrumpia / Character

I know you know

he is a cheater,

because we’ve all grown up with and dealt with cheaters, and cheating for him is a way of life, and yet,

you don’t say a thing.

I know you know

he is a bully,

because we’ve all grown up with and dealt with bullies, and he is the classic bully who bluffs and cowardly hides behind his meanness, and yet,

you don’t say a thing.

I know you know

he is a liar,

because we’ve all grown up with and been damaged by liars, and his lying is epic and pathologic and dangerous and destructive, and yet,

you don’t say a thing.

I know you know

he is a racist,

because we’ve all grown up with and dealt with racists, and he is the poster boy for the unapologetic privileged white racist nationalist, and yet,

you don’t say a thing.

Why is that?

Are you not against

  • cheating
  • bullying
  • lying, and
  • discrimination?

Then where is the outrage?!

Where is the courage of your convictions?

Stand up!

Speak out!

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Does Character Matter?

Featured
Two-Party Madness

Two-Party Madness

Big Picture / Human Society / Politics & Government / Approval Voting

How do we insure that our political system elects a president that serves the majority of American citizens, and not just half? I believe the dysfunction we observe in politics is driven by our two-party construct. It has created a “Hatfields vs McCoys,” us vs them battleground behavior that repeats and repeats and the cycle cannot be broken, oftentimes at the expense of good ideas.

For a politician to survive and move up over time, they must “get along to go along” even when they know something is just not right by their own set of values and principles. At times they sacrifice their values-based instincts to the will of the Party. Politicians routinely flip-flop their positions in plain sight in a shameless attempt to curry favor with the Party and/or President. I suppose we all do this to some extent in our jobs, in our churches, and all social settings to protect our respective positions in our tribes.

I believe in and vote for ideas, principles and character, not a party, because our two-party system — fueled by tribalism and disinformation — has devolved into a poisoned institution that is like a badly divorced couple who demonize each other at every turn.

The Party campaigns backed by enormous capital have become killing machines that are not past doing anything to scuttle a candidate and the other party’s ship. They mirror the overall problems we have with BIG BUREAUCRACY — governmental and corporate — with too much unchecked wealth and power, and when and where that happens, waste, cronyism, corruption, and fraud fester in the shadows.

We can solve this by doing several things:

  • Abolish lifetime professional politicians with Term Limits.
  • Abolish the electoral college and return to
    • 1 person, 1 vote, and
    • majority rules, may the best person win.
  • Abolish plurality voting and adopt approval voting.

Our current system of plurality voting means we vote for only one candidate: either that Party A’s candidate, or Party B’s candidate. A system of approval voting would provide open access to the political arena for all deserving parties and independent candidates. An approval voting system would allow people to vote for several candidates for an elected position, and the candidate with the highest number of votes is declared the winner. It’s simple, and we all understand it!

Approval voting can become a check-and-balance against the cumulative abuses of the two-party system which is whipsawing our democracy in a destructive, mean-spirited fashion.

That said, the reality is it’s hard to create an ideal governance system that works for everybody when humans are at the controls because humans will always game systems to optimize their selfish personal advantage.

Sometimes we’re just too clever for our own good.

also by sp

The Culture of Politics

The Culture of Politics

The Culture of Politics

Big Picture / Human Society / Politics & Government

The dysfunction and gridlock we see in federal and state governments across the country are a reflection of the culture of professional politicians who are, for the most part, attorneys by background. I might be wrong that they would be the first to admit it, but attorneys (who become politicians) are by nature aggressive, smart, cunning, and willing to push the limits of the rule of law, norms and ethics to win their case (or election).

Their bread-and-butter tactic is the plea bargain, as opposed to the jury trial where there is at least some open discussion by an impartial jury of citizens. Attorneys know that in the plea bargaining process, leverage is everything and you build leverage by saying “no,” and being stubborn and relentless in your demands until the very last moment and settling for the best financial outcome one can achieve. This, unfortunately, leaves little room for so-called bipartisanship, dialogue, listening, real consideration of the opposing parties viewpoint, collaboration, and certainly not empathy. Attorneys don’t cry.

The culture of politics and its dysfunction and gridlock disserves the American people. Politicians need to leave their stubborn and aggressive tactics at home with their private practice. If they are elected to office and in spite of what their party may say, they need to bring their bipartisan A-game to Washington in better service to our democracy.

We the American people deserve nothing less.

sp

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Willful Ignorance

Eventually, We Will All Be Melting Pots of Each Other

Eventually, We Will All Be Melting Pots of Each Other

In time, we will all be melting pots of each other. Go to an airport someday and look around. Watch everyone that boards your plane. Clearly America is no longer a land of white Anglo-Saxons. We are from every location, every race, every color, every creed, and as the internet and jet travel and migration continue to bring us together, people will increasingly cross national and racial lines to join and build lifelong relationships.

America has been called a melting pot, but it seems better to call it a mosaic, for in it each nation, people or race which has come to its shores has been privileged to keep its individuality, contributing at the same time its share to the unified pattern of a new nation.

King Baudouin of Belgium, 1930 – 1993

Social change is like a strong flowing river where you can try to swim upstream initially, but eventually you must acquiesce to the power and direction of the river. The growing melting pot is a social flowing river and to try and swim upstream to turn back the clock and make America all-white and all-Christian not only will not happen, but it should not happen.

We’ll need to embrace this fact and face the challenge of making our country work for everybody. It won’t be easy and there will be big problems along the way, but it is the inevitable evolution of every country that they can no longer remain homogeneous in race, but will all be melting pots of each other. The longer we fight against this, the more problems we will cause and the harder it will be to achieve a lasting peace inside and outside our countries and populations.

However, Americans need to accept the competing tensions between two issues: our openness and respect for all immigrant populations; and, the fact that dysfunctional immigration processes do cause problems for all of us (illegal drugs, terrorism, crime, overloaded social systems). The goal should be as it is in so many cases, to reach a reasonable, fair, and equitable balance between these two priorities.

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Big Picture

Big Picture / Human Society / Social Organization / Immigration / Melting Pot

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